BETTER CONNECTIVITY THROUGH INTEROPERABILITY

Systems of care, multi-disciplinary teams, family response assessments: significant undertakings within child welfare, are all woven together with a consistent, unifying thread. They are models of child welfare practice that seek to gain a complete view of a child, youth and his/her family. This guides decision making and better outcomes. Another vital way such practices have been enhanced is through data sharing or exchanges across multiple disparate computer systems from a range of human service organizations, i.e. interoperability.

Not long ago, the 2016 CCWIS ruling bolstered this by requiring the bi-directional exchange of relevant data across child-serving agencies such as education, courts, behavioral health, etc.  This heralded the tremendous benefits of interoperability to the health and human service community.

CareDirector is the only child welfare information system in the world to be deployed on the Microsoft Dynamics platform.  It fully supports compliance to CCWIS’ interoperability rules. Technically, our solution has what is needed to provide states with the capability to meet and exceed the requirement. It enables agencies to improve efficiency, saves them time and effort; thereby resulting in higher cost savings. Beyond that, as a child welfare software provider with 20 + years of experience, we fully understand that interoperability is not simply about pieces of data flowing from one system to another. It is about deeper, better connectivity into the client’s world, so caseworkers can develop holistic case/service plans that fully support the needs of the child, youth or family. Yes, the cliched phrase is quite true: it breaks down silos within and across agencies. Yet, it is much more.

With over 20 years singly focused expertise in child welfare, CareDirector’s interoperable capability breaks down silos between workers and families. With timely data at their fingertips from various systems that inform them about the family and their participation across systems, less time is spent searching for information. Instead, more time is now spent understanding the readily available, comprehensive information to make better decisions that impact outcomes for families, youth and children.

Dr. Ann Knefel

Child Welfare Specialist